General Information 541-754-1150
Same-Day Care: QuickCare Immediate Care

Corvallis Clinic Health Information Blog

Our dirty little secret

Jan 29, 04:29 PM

Admit it. This snappy title got your attention!  It gets even better because the subject of this blog is money - the green stuff.  I’m writing about this topic today because I’ve recently been asked a couple of times by prospective patients: “How much will it cost me to participate in the study?”  If this blog had sound effects, this last sentence would have been followed immediately by the sound of a record stylus being jerked off a record.  I was surprised that volunteers expected they would need to “pay to play.”  So, let’s set the record straight: 

YOU SHOULD NEVER PAY ANYTHING TO BE INVOLVED IN A LEGITIMATE CLINICAL TRIAL. 

Clinical Research Center

In fact, the reverse is true.  There is often - but not always - a small stipend paid to study volunteers for each study visit.  The stipends are modest by design and are intended to cover the volunteer’s expenses for trial participation (gas, parking, child care, etc.).  Good clinical practice mandates that a stipend can’t be so large as to be coercive and potentially influence the patient volunteer’s decision to participate.

So, this is our dirty little secret: We do give a monetary stipend  to our trial volunteers for their participation in our studies.  In clinical research, we don’t like to talk about volunteer stipends because we don’t want to influence a volunteer’s decision to participate.  Truthfully, most of our volunteers tell us they are not participating for financial gain but because they realize the study might benefit themselves and other patients down the road.

The Clinical Research Center is currently seeking volunteer patients in studies for Type 2 diabetes, walking difficulties after a stroke, those with very high triglyceride levels, COPD and contraception.  For the record, each of the volunteers who qualify for participation in these studies receives a modest stipend for each study visit!

If you are interested in learning more about clinical trials, contact the Clinical Research Center at 541-766-2163, or send an email to research@corvallisclinic.com or fill out our Research Study Information Requestform. And, don’t forget to follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/corvallisclinicresearch.

- Julie Carrico is Associate Coordinator of The Corvallis Clinical Research Center



Center overcame challenges in most productive year

Dec 31, 08:00 AM

Clinical Research Center

It’s been quite a year at the Clinical Research Center, our most productive ever –  taking care of patients on 19 studies!  We also faced staffing challenges, with one longtime team member retiring and two others needing time off to take care of family issues.  As a team, we rose to the challenge and completed over 800 research patient appointments. Whew!

You might be wondering how we saw patients from 19 studies, although at any given time we are only advertising five to seven.  This apparent disparity comes about because, even though a given study has reached its enrollment goal and is no longer advertising for volunteers, its patients are still coming in for their visits.

Next year promises to be just as busy for us.  As we’ve stated before, our site is committed to being involved with innovative Alzheimer’s disease research and 2016 will be no exception.  Our next Alzheimer’s disease clinical study will begin late this winter.  We are thrilled to have been selected for this exciting potential treatment.  We’ll be posting more information about the study soon.  In the meantime, here is a quote from clinical research ally Michael J. Fox, who sums up our mission nicely:

"Medical science has proven time and again that when the resources are provided, great progress in the treatment, cure, and prevention of disease can occur."

The Clinical Research Center is currently seeking volunteer patients in studies for Type 2 diabetes, moderate to severe asthma, walking difficulties after a stroke, those with very high triglyceride levels, COPD and contraception.

If you are interested in learning more about clinical trials, contact the Clinical Research Center at 541-766-2163, or send an email to research@corvallisclinic.com or fill out our Research Study Information Request form.  And, follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/corvallisclinicresearch. 

- Julie Carrico is Associate Coordinator of The Corvallis Clinical Research Center


Trial volunteers with COPD "exacerbations" are sought

Dec 11, 11:27 AM

The Research Center is conducting a study to evaluate a potential new treatment for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), described by the American Lung Association as a progressive lung disease that over time makes it hard to breathe.  Patients are sometimes confused about the diagnosis of COPD because it is frequently referred to as chronic bronchitis or emphysema or both. The majority of patients with COPD have a significant history of smoking cigarettes. 

Clinical Research Center

The primary complaint of most patients with COPD is feeling short of breath, especially when they are active.  Even such light activities as vacuuming and short walks can be difficult.  There are many daily medications available to treat the symptoms of COPD; these medications overlap somewhat with those used to treat asthma.

The current COPD research study is specifically looking for volunteers who, even though they are using daily medications for symptom management, have had one or two lung-related illnesses in the last year that have required treatment with antibiotics or steroids or both.  These breakthrough illnesses are called exacerbations.  Exacerbations can very serious, sometimes resulting in a hospitalization.  The investigational treatment is being evaluated to see if the patients who use it have fewer COPD exacerbations.

The Research Center and Dr. Vincent Gimino invite current or ex-smokers over 40 years of age who have been diagnosed with COPD and who have experienced one or more exacerbations to consider volunteering for this study.  All participants in the study receive active treatment.

Note: In addition to the COPD study, we're also enrolling patients in studies for Type 2 diabetes, moderate to severe asthma, walking difficulties after a stroke, those with very high triglyceride levels, a shingles vaccine, and contraception.

If you are interested in learning more about clinical trials, contact the Clinical Research Center at 541-766-2163, or send an email to research@corvallisclinic.com or fill out our Research Study Information Request form.  And, follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/corvallisclinicresearch. 

- Julie Carrico is Associate Coordinator of The Corvallis Clinical Research Center 


Seeking moderate to severe asthma sufferers

Nov 23, 11:29 AM

Clinical Research Center

According to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, an estimated 26 million Americans have asthma. So, so it’s no wonder that most of us know someone who has this chronic lung disease.  Common symptoms of asthma are coughing, shortness of breath, wheezing and chest tightness. 

Asthma is the result of an inflammatory process that constricts the airways; if the inflammation can be controlled, asthma symptoms are reduced.  Most asthma patients lead normal lives, perhaps using one or more daily medications to control the inflammatory process and thus control asthma symptoms.

However, some asthma patients have moderate to severe asthma; their symptoms are not well controlled, even though they are receiving standard treatment. Research aimed at finding new treatments for those with moderate to severe asthma have focused on finding better ways to control the inflammatory process.  For example, our bodies naturally produce proteins called interleukins, which assist in the production of eosinophils, a type of white blood cell that is the main perpetrator of inflammation. Would a treatment that could interrupt the production of interleukins limit inflammation and thus reduce asthma symptoms? 

The Research Center and Dr. Roland Solensky, an allergist and immunologist at The Corvallis Clinic, are involved in clinical studies to find the answer to this question.  The center is looking for patients between 12-75 years old who have moderate to severe asthma.  Patients who might qualify for this study will have had at least two asthma attacks within the past year that required steroid use or a visit to the ER or an urgent care center.  Research nurse Lisa would be happy to tell you more about this important study.

In addition to the moderate/severe asthma study, we're also enrolling patients in studies for Type 2 diabetes, COPD, walking difficulties after a stroke, those with very high triglyceride levels and contraception.

If you are interested in learning more about clinical trials, contact the Clinical Research Center at 541-766-2163 or send an email to research@corvallisclinic.com.  Or, follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/corvallisclinicresearch.

- Julie Carrico is Associate Coordinator of The Corvallis Clinical Research Center 


Support for caregivers of Alzheimer's patients is vital

Nov 01, 06:00 AM

Clinical Research Center

November is National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month and National Caregiver Month.  About 5.1 million Americans age 65 and older have Alzheimer’s disease, with some 15 million caregivers involved in their daily lives.  That means 20 million Americans are impacted by the disease.

At the Clinical Research Center, we are doing everything we can to help find treatments that will prevent, cure or slow the progress of Alzheimer’s disease.  We have blogged previously about our involvement in Alzheimer’s research as part of the Expedition 3 clinical trial.  We‘ve now been working with the Expedition 3 patients and their study partners/caregivers for almost two years; we’re about halfway through the trial. 

Since the patients and their study partners come in once a month for treatment, we’ve gotten to know them pretty well.  Here’s one interesting observation made by a study nurse: Caregivers who keep their “patients” busy with activities - such as travel, movies, fishing and other hobbies - don’t complain as much about their patients’ cognitive issues.  So, clearly, support for the caregivers is critical.

The Alzheimer’s Association has an amazing assortment of caregiver resources, including a 24/7 telephone Helpline and a search engine for finding assistance in your community.  In addition, the Caregiver Action Network (CAN) offers programs and tips to improve the quality of life for caretakers who are managing chronic conditions, disabilities, or disease.  CAN offers this important tip to caregivers: Take care of your own health so that you can be strong enough to take care of your loved one.

We’ll be posting a new video tomorrow about research at The Corvallis Clinic.  This video features a patient and her study partner as they explain why they sought to participate in an Alzheimer’s disease research project.  The video, although only 1 minute long, describes their journey and the hope it has inspired.

If you are interested in learning more about our studies, contact the Clinical Research Center at 541-766-2163 or send an email to research@corvallisclinic.com.  Or, follow us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/corvallisclinicresearch.

- Julie Carrico is Associate Coordinator of The Corvallis Clinical Research Center